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Paulo Aokuso vs Robert Berridge, who is Paulo Aokuso, Tokyo Olympics, journey, Mount Druitt, training, life story, video, highlights, latest

Within seven years, Paulo Akuso moved from Olympiacos to Olympia.

After a stellar amateur career in Tokyo last year, Akuso won his first Australian Open Lightweight title in Michael Van Nimwegen at the TKO in his professional debut in April.

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On June 29, the 25-year-old Akuso’s first defense was locked in Robert Bridges in Brisbane, and he is hoping to continue his promotion.

It is not a bad trip for a boy who climbed Mount Druit, especially when he was able to “go his own way” in his youth.

“I grew up in Mount Druitt, I always see it as a good community,” Akuso said foxsports.com.au.

“Everyone helps, everyone helps us.

“A lot of other things are going up on Drew Mountain, but at the same time, I am not coming around. I could have gone the other way, but I chose to stay on the right track and focus on my sport and school.

Akuso does not think that the Drut Mountain has a “negative” perception of the average person.

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But you will find it difficult to find a person who is as proud as he is who has made iron on the light weight of his heavy hand today.

“People think, ‘Oh, Mount Drut, they do this and that,'” Akuso said.

“But I grew up and I am still in Drut Mountain, I love this place. Everyone grinds here and no one likes to be defeated. Everyone here is for the community.”

Akuso is one of the many famous sports stars who have changed the image of Mount Dru and made its residents even more proud of their origins.

He cites several Panthers players, such as Brian Toe and Stephen Criston.

There is also the UFC heavyweight Thai ‘Bam’ Tuivasa and the popular rap group Onefour.

For Akuso, being part of a new wave of stars is unthinkable.

“It’s great to practice and even be a part of this,” Akuso said.

“Who would have thought that we could get so many famous athletes in so little, so small?

“Basically we are the best in the sport. The best in rugby league, the best in the UFC. I’m going to box it. ”

Akuso won through TKO.  Picture: No Limit Box
Akuso won through TKO. Picture: No Limit BoxSource fall-provided

Amazingly, Akuso as a child “never boxed”.

Playing rugby league and running in the cave for the NRL team was “always a dream”.

But the rugby league fires in the late teens and Akuson doesn’t know what to do with himself.

It was Kigilaw, the old man, who took his son to boxing at the age of 17 and gave him a new life.

At first, Kigilu did not consider Paul to be a “good boxer.”

Now it is a completely different story.

“He never thought he would be a good boxer because it is very difficult to be a boxer,” Akuso said.

“You have to be not only physically strong but also mentally strong. My father did not see it in me, but as I continued to practice and improve, he began to see the change and said, ‘I think boxing is for you.’

It was only after the boy’s first battle that he broke the switch in his mind and convinced his son that he would succeed in the middle of the ropes.

And since then, Akuso has not looked back.

“My father saw that I was inside, and we have been fighting ever since,” Akuso said.

Akuso believes he can go to great lengths. Picture: No Limit BoxSource fall-provided

“Every second week, every third week. We were fighting for the best in Australia during my first year of boxing and I think that’s what made me grow so fast.

As Akuso continues to build his boxing career, there are countless compelling reasons to push one or more rounds during training sessions when the gas tank is empty.

Of course, the financial benefits are there and not exactly hidden in view.

The same is true of the admiration and praise of their supporters who gather to watch him go into battle.

But it is also a constant reminder to two of the most important people to drive Akuson beyond the known limits.

“They always remind me that we came from nothing,” says Akuso.

“It reminds me every day, it makes me work harder. Seeing my mom and dad working 9-5 days a day motivates me to be a better person and to be a better athlete.

“Then I can go down to the truck and help them financially.”

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